Carb counting: Could there be a better way?

The current gold standard for calculating mealtime insulin in people with type 1 diabetes is carbohydrate counting using the carbohydrate to insulin ratio – the amount of insulin that will cover a certain amount of carbohydrates. Recent research and clinical observations from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data has seen that people can experience delayed high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) hours after eating a meal high in fat and/or protein.  Read More

Australian diabetes expert recognised with prestigious international award

JDRF-funded researcher Professor Mark Cooper, Chief Scientific Officer and Head of the Diabetes Division at Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, has become the first Australian to receive the prestigious Claude Bernard award from the European Association for the Study of Diabetes this month.  Read More

T1DCRN awards nearly $4 million in new funding for the next generation of type 1 diabetes research

Minister Simon Birmingham has announced that nearly $4 million has been awarded to Australian researchers for the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) and Career Development Awards.

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Common virus increases activity of T1D-risk genes in pancreatic islets


Image credit: University of Pennsylvania

Infection with a common virus known as coxsackievirus B has long been thought to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. Now, researchers have published evidence that this virus could be driving the activity of the very genes that increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.  Read More

Early probiotic use could help prevent type 1 diabetes in at-risk children

Giving probiotics to babies in the first few weeks of life may lower their risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a recent study has found.


The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics found that children who were given probiotics within the first 27 days of life had a 60% reduction in the risk of developing islet autoimmunity, compared with children who were first given probiotics after 27 days or not at all. Read More

Sanofi and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals partner on new non-insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes

JDRF partner Sanofi and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals have announced a new collaboration to develop and commercialise a new oral drug for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Nadav Kidron, CEO of Oramed Pharmaceuticals, poses for a photo in Jerusalem

The drug is called sotagliflozin and is used in conjunction with insulin to help improve blood glucose levels by blocking glucose absorption in the kidneys and the gut.  Read More

World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.


The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More

T1DCRN awards $14 million for type 1 diabetes clinical research

The Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) announced today that over $14 million in grants have been awarded to Australian researchers for clinical research projects commencing in 2016.

RFA1 Announcement 090915

This funding forms part of the $35 million funding awarded to the T1DCRN by the Australian Research Council, and will support five innovative programs targeting a broad range of T1D research areas including: Read More

Innovative biodegradable scaffold protects transplanted islets

A new technique that could drastically improve outcomes of human islet transplantation has been successful in a world-first clinical trial.

BioHub scaffold

The technique, developed by the US-based Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) and supported in part by JDRF funding, involves transplanting islets in a biodegradable ‘scaffold’ into the omentum, a fold of tissue that covers and protects the abdominal organs. Read More