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Insulin pump with predictive low glucose management function reduces hypoglycaemia exposure in young people with type 1 diabetes

A T1DCRN funded clinical trial published in Diabetes Care has shown that a pump with the ability to suspend insulin delivery when blood glucose levels begin to fall can reduce hypoglycaemic episodes without deterioration in glycaemic control.

Members of the PLGM study team L-R: Dr Mary Abraham, Prof Tim Jones, Dr Charles Czank, Prof Liz Davis and Ms Jennifer Nicholas

The integration of real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems and pump therapy has been an important milestone in the management of type 1 diabetes, and advances in the technology field offers the potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

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Results from the Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Cardio-Renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT)

The international AdDIT trial group have this month published results of a four year clinical trial in The New England Journal of Medicine, finding that ACE inhibitors and statins did not change the primary outcome – the albumin to creatinine ratio – compared to placebo in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).  Read More

T1DCRN awards $350K in seed funding grants

Two promising research projects have been targeted to receive contract seed funding grants, and will benefit from $350K in funding from the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN), itself an innovative clinical research program led by JDRF Australia and funded by a Special Research Initiative through the Australian Research Council (ARC).

Professor Peter Thorn (left) and Dr Vincent Ho

These two projects will explore new directions in curing and treating T1D and its complications. Read More

Tool could help predict lack of ‘honeymoon phase’ in young people with type 1 diabetes

A new study has developed a prediction tool to help clinicians predict which newly diagnosed children and adolescents are unlikely to experience a period of remission.

The remission phase, also called the honeymoon phase, is the period of time after clinical diagnosis of T1D where the body can make just enough insulin (“endogenous” insulin) to control blood glucose levels either without needing insulin injections or with significantly lower doses.  Read More

Children with type 1 diabetes at risk of acute kidney injury following DKA

A new study has found that children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are hospitalised for Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) are more likely to develop acute kidney injury (AKI), a sudden episode of renal failure or damage. DKA is a severe complication that occurs with prolonged hyperglycaemia. It may occur at the initial presentation of newly diagnosed T1D or in someone with pre-existing T1D in times of illness or insulin omission.
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First audit of national data from Australia’s unique registry highlights an urgent need to improve glycaemic control in young people with T1D.

International diabetes registries report that many young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) do not meet their recommended targets for glycaemic control, however relevant Australian data has been lacking. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) funded by the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) and led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Society (APEG) and Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) is a secure, centralised database that captures de-identified clinical data from thousands of people after diagnosis of T1D on a single purpose built database. The ADDN study group has published the first national surveillance of glycaemic control and management of type 1 diabetes in young people in Australia.

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Consensus report to help people with type 1 diabetes exercise safely

A report by leading type 1 diabetes experts from around the world has for the first time provided consensus on managing blood glucose levels safely while exercising.

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The report, ‘Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement’ was published in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal and involved a team of 21 researchers, including T1DCRN researchers Professor Tim Jones, Professor Paul Fournier and Dr Carmel Smart. They undertook a review of current published studies to understand the activity levels of those living with type 1 diabetes and how different types of exercise affect blood glucose levels.  Read More

Australian diabetes expert receives Australia Day honour

JDRF is proud to congratulate Professor Mark Cooper, Head of Diabetes in the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences at Monash University, who was awarded an AO (Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia) on Australia Day this month.

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This award is the most prestigious means of recognising outstanding members of the community at a national level.

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Carb counting: Could there be a better way?

The current gold standard for calculating mealtime insulin in people with type 1 diabetes is carbohydrate counting using the carbohydrate to insulin ratio – the amount of insulin that will cover a certain amount of carbohydrates. Recent research and clinical observations from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data has seen that people can experience delayed high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) hours after eating a meal high in fat and/or protein.  Read More

Sanofi and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals partner on new non-insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes

JDRF partner Sanofi and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals have announced a new collaboration to develop and commercialise a new oral drug for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Nadav Kidron, CEO of Oramed Pharmaceuticals, poses for a photo in Jerusalem

The drug is called sotagliflozin and is used in conjunction with insulin to help improve blood glucose levels by blocking glucose absorption in the kidneys and the gut.  Read More