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Insulin pump with predictive low glucose management function reduces hypoglycaemia exposure in young people with type 1 diabetes

A T1DCRN funded clinical trial published in Diabetes Care has shown that a pump with the ability to suspend insulin delivery when blood glucose levels begin to fall can reduce hypoglycaemic episodes without deterioration in glycaemic control.

Members of the PLGM study team L-R: Dr Mary Abraham, Prof Tim Jones, Dr Charles Czank, Prof Liz Davis and Ms Jennifer Nicholas

The integration of real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems and pump therapy has been an important milestone in the management of type 1 diabetes, and advances in the technology field offers the potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

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Results from the Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Cardio-Renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT)

The international AdDIT trial group have this month published results of a four year clinical trial in The New England Journal of Medicine, finding that ACE inhibitors and statins did not change the primary outcome – the albumin to creatinine ratio – compared to placebo in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).  Read More

Tool could help predict lack of ‘honeymoon phase’ in young people with type 1 diabetes

A new study has developed a prediction tool to help clinicians predict which newly diagnosed children and adolescents are unlikely to experience a period of remission.

The remission phase, also called the honeymoon phase, is the period of time after clinical diagnosis of T1D where the body can make just enough insulin (“endogenous” insulin) to control blood glucose levels either without needing insulin injections or with significantly lower doses.  Read More

First audit of national data from Australia’s unique registry highlights an urgent need to improve glycaemic control in young people with T1D.

International diabetes registries report that many young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) do not meet their recommended targets for glycaemic control, however relevant Australian data has been lacking. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) funded by the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) and led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Society (APEG) and Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) is a secure, centralised database that captures de-identified clinical data from thousands of people after diagnosis of T1D on a single purpose built database. The ADDN study group has published the first national surveillance of glycaemic control and management of type 1 diabetes in young people in Australia.

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World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.

Tocilizumab

The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More

Psoriasis drug may halt the destruction of beta cells in T1D

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be able to preserve their remaining beta cells with alefacept, a drug normally used for psoriasis.

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A recent clinical trial has shown that alefacept was able to slow or halt the progression of beta cell destruction in people newly diagnosed with T1D, even two years after completing treatment. Read More

Rapid stomach emptying in teenagers with T1D

A study at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Adelaide has shown that adolescents with type 1 diabetes have a faster than normal gastric (stomach) emptying time. This rapid digestion of carbohydrate-containing meals can lead to higher blood glucose levels after eating, impacting long-term blood glucose control.

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The study compared the gastric emptying time of 30 adolescents with T1D with age- and sex-matched controls following a standardised meal. The median time taken for half of the meal to be emptied from the stomach was 78 minutes in adolescents with T1D, compared with 109 minutes in controls.  Faster gastric emptying resulted in higher blood glucose levels after the meal. Read More