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First class of future research leaders feel fibre might find a faster cure

A world first program designed to help medical researchers in type one diabetes develop their leadership skills to help take innovations out of the lab and into the real world has graduated its first intake. The graduates, announced in Canberra on June 26th 2018, have already put their skills into practice, securing funding to look at a dietary supplement that could stop type one diabetes. Read More

Insulin pump with predictive low glucose management function reduces hypoglycaemia exposure in young people with type 1 diabetes

A T1DCRN funded clinical trial published in Diabetes Care has shown that a pump with the ability to suspend insulin delivery when blood glucose levels begin to fall can reduce hypoglycaemic episodes without deterioration in glycaemic control.

Members of the PLGM study team L-R: Dr Mary Abraham, Prof Tim Jones, Dr Charles Czank, Prof Liz Davis and Ms Jennifer Nicholas

The integration of real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems and pump therapy has been an important milestone in the management of type 1 diabetes, and advances in the technology field offers the potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

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Results from the Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Cardio-Renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT)

The international AdDIT trial group have this month published results of a four year clinical trial in The New England Journal of Medicine, finding that ACE inhibitors and statins did not change the primary outcome – the albumin to creatinine ratio – compared to placebo in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).  Read More

First audit of national data from Australia’s unique registry highlights an urgent need to improve glycaemic control in young people with T1D.

International diabetes registries report that many young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) do not meet their recommended targets for glycaemic control, however relevant Australian data has been lacking. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) funded by the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) and led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Society (APEG) and Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) is a secure, centralised database that captures de-identified clinical data from thousands of people after diagnosis of T1D on a single purpose built database. The ADDN study group has published the first national surveillance of glycaemic control and management of type 1 diabetes in young people in Australia.

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T1DCRN awards $4.5 million in innovative research grants

Senator The Hon Simon Birmingham, Minister for Education and Training, and The Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport, have today announced the recipients of Innovation Award grants for research into type 1 diabetes.

Three bold, promising research projects have been selected and will benefit from $4.5 million in funding from the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN), itself an innovative clinical research program led by JDRF Australia and funded by a Special Research Initiative through the Australian Research Council (ARC).

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In an exciting paradigm shift that aims to accelerate patient impact, the research funded by the Innovation Award grants will explore new directions in the search for a cure for type 1 diabetes, including concepts that have never before been investigated.

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World leading experts discuss innovative ideas in T1D research

In early December, the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) brought together leading national and international experts in type 1 diabetes (T1D) to the Woolcock Institute in Sydney for the 2016 BRIdGE Symposium.

T1DCRN 2016 Symposium
Prof Chantal Mathieu, Director of the Endocrinology Clinic at the University Hospital of Leuven

This year’s theme was innovation in autoimmunity and complications. A mix of high calibre clinicians, clinical researchers and basic researchers from areas such as immunology, genetics and paediatrics mingled and shared their novel ideas for accelerating research in T1D.

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T1DCRN awards nearly $4 million in new funding for the next generation of type 1 diabetes research

Minister Simon Birmingham has announced that nearly $4 million has been awarded to Australian researchers for the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) and Career Development Awards.

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World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.

Tocilizumab

The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More

T1DCRN awards $14 million for type 1 diabetes clinical research

The Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) announced today that over $14 million in grants have been awarded to Australian researchers for clinical research projects commencing in 2016.

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This funding forms part of the $35 million funding awarded to the T1DCRN by the Australian Research Council, and will support five innovative programs targeting a broad range of T1D research areas including: Read More

A new individualised approach to severe hypoglycaemia

T1DCRN researcher Professor Thomas Kay from St Vincent’s Institute in Melbourne and an international team of specialists have developed a new four-stage treatment plan to tackle problematic hypoglycaemia.

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Severe hypoglycaemia is experienced by a third of people with type 1 diabetes at least once per year, when they will require another person to assist them in recovery. Severe hypoglycaemia can usually be explained by exercise, alcohol or errors in insulin dose, but in some people it is unpredictable and can occur seemingly without explanation.  This problematic hypoglycaemia has significant impacts on health and quality of life, but can be difficult to treat. Read More