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Tool could help predict lack of ‘honeymoon phase’ in young people with type 1 diabetes

A new study has developed a prediction tool to help clinicians predict which newly diagnosed children and adolescents are unlikely to experience a period of remission.

The remission phase, also called the honeymoon phase, is the period of time after clinical diagnosis of T1D where the body can make just enough insulin (“endogenous” insulin) to control blood glucose levels either without needing insulin injections or with significantly lower doses.  Read More

Evidence building for possible virus link in T1D development

A new study suggests a link between enteroviruses, and the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This study, part-funded by JDRF, isn’t the first to find this link but the authors say it’s the largest and most definitive study of its kind to date.

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Professor Keikki HyÖty and Dr Hanna Honkanen led this study published in Diabetologia at the University of Tampere in Finland. They found that children at high risk of T1D who then go on to develop the disease, had a higher number of enterovirus infections compared to those without the disease.

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Early probiotic use could help prevent type 1 diabetes in at-risk children

Giving probiotics to babies in the first few weeks of life may lower their risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a recent study has found.

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The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics found that children who were given probiotics within the first 27 days of life had a 60% reduction in the risk of developing islet autoimmunity, compared with children who were first given probiotics after 27 days or not at all. Read More

T1DCRN awards $14 million for type 1 diabetes clinical research

The Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) announced today that over $14 million in grants have been awarded to Australian researchers for clinical research projects commencing in 2016.

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This funding forms part of the $35 million funding awarded to the T1DCRN by the Australian Research Council, and will support five innovative programs targeting a broad range of T1D research areas including: Read More

Psoriasis drug may halt the destruction of beta cells in T1D

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be able to preserve their remaining beta cells with alefacept, a drug normally used for psoriasis.

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A recent clinical trial has shown that alefacept was able to slow or halt the progression of beta cell destruction in people newly diagnosed with T1D, even two years after completing treatment. Read More

Serious life events in childhood can triple the risk of type 1 diabetes

Children who experience traumatic events such as illness, death in the family, conflict at home or other psychological stress were found to be up to three times more likely to develop type 1 diabetes, a Swedish study has found.

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The study, published in Diabetologia, examined the occurrence of psychological stress and development of type 1 diabetes in over 10,000 children aged 3-14 from the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) study. Family stress was measured using questionnaires filled out by parents about the occurrence of serious life events, parental stress, and available social support. In total, 58 children were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during the study period, and of these, 59% had experienced psychological stress, compared with 30% of children that did not go on to develop type 1 diabetes. The difference was significant even when taking into account family history of type 1 diabetes. Read More