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JDRF clinical research features at American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) Scientific Sessions 2018

This year’s American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida highlighted some important JDRF-supported research underway, encompassing breakthrough clinical trials and significant research findings that are paving the way to novel and emerging treatments for T1D.

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First class of future research leaders feel fibre might find a faster cure

A world first program designed to help medical researchers in type one diabetes develop their leadership skills to help take innovations out of the lab and into the real world has graduated its first intake. The graduates, announced in Canberra on June 26th 2018, have already put their skills into practice, securing funding to look at a dietary supplement that could stop type one diabetes. Read More

Insulin pump with predictive low glucose management function reduces hypoglycaemia exposure in young people with type 1 diabetes

A T1DCRN funded clinical trial published in Diabetes Care has shown that a pump with the ability to suspend insulin delivery when blood glucose levels begin to fall can reduce hypoglycaemic episodes without deterioration in glycaemic control.

Members of the PLGM study team L-R: Dr Mary Abraham, Prof Tim Jones, Dr Charles Czank, Prof Liz Davis and Ms Jennifer Nicholas

The integration of real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems and pump therapy has been an important milestone in the management of type 1 diabetes, and advances in the technology field offers the potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

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Results from the Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes Cardio-Renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT)

The international AdDIT trial group have this month published results of a four year clinical trial in The New England Journal of Medicine, finding that ACE inhibitors and statins did not change the primary outcome – the albumin to creatinine ratio – compared to placebo in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).  Read More

The shape of the glucose concentration curve during an OGTT predicts risk for T1D

A recent study published in Diabetologia from the TrialNet group has found that the shape of the glucose curve during a glucose tolerance test predicted risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. TrialNet is an international network of leading academic institutions, clinicians, scientists and healthcare teams dedicated to the prevention of T1D. Read More

Immunotherapy found to be safe in pilot study of people with T1D

A pilot clinical trial in the US has found a new immunotherapy treatment to be safe in people with new onset type 1 diabetes (T1D).

After clinical presentation of T1D, beta cell loss continues progressively in most people until C-peptide levels, a marker of endogenous insulin production, is absent or present in very low levels. Despite intensive research efforts for more than 20 years, no therapy is currently available to prevent beta cell loss in T1D.

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Findings may improve prediction of T1D risk for prevention studies

TrialNet is an international collaborative network that aims to prevent, delay and reverse the progression of type 1 diabetes, involving United States, Canada, Finland, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, Australia and New Zealand.

TrialNet in Australia/New Zealand is led by A/Prof John Wentworth at Walter & Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) in collaboration with Prof Peter Colman AM.

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Tool could help predict lack of ‘honeymoon phase’ in young people with type 1 diabetes

A new study has developed a prediction tool to help clinicians predict which newly diagnosed children and adolescents are unlikely to experience a period of remission.

The remission phase, also called the honeymoon phase, is the period of time after clinical diagnosis of T1D where the body can make just enough insulin (“endogenous” insulin) to control blood glucose levels either without needing insulin injections or with significantly lower doses.  Read More

Children with type 1 diabetes at risk of acute kidney injury following DKA

A new study has found that children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are hospitalised for Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) are more likely to develop acute kidney injury (AKI), a sudden episode of renal failure or damage. DKA is a severe complication that occurs with prolonged hyperglycaemia. It may occur at the initial presentation of newly diagnosed T1D or in someone with pre-existing T1D in times of illness or insulin omission.
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First audit of national data from Australia’s unique registry highlights an urgent need to improve glycaemic control in young people with T1D.

International diabetes registries report that many young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) do not meet their recommended targets for glycaemic control, however relevant Australian data has been lacking. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) funded by the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) and led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Society (APEG) and Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) is a secure, centralised database that captures de-identified clinical data from thousands of people after diagnosis of T1D on a single purpose built database. The ADDN study group has published the first national surveillance of glycaemic control and management of type 1 diabetes in young people in Australia.

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