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T1DCRN awards $350K in seed funding grants

Two promising research projects have been targeted to receive contract seed funding grants, and will benefit from $350K in funding from the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN), itself an innovative clinical research program led by JDRF Australia and funded by a Special Research Initiative through the Australian Research Council (ARC).

Professor Peter Thorn (left) and Dr Vincent Ho

These two projects will explore new directions in curing and treating T1D and its complications. Read More

T1DCRN awards $4.5 million in innovative research grants

Senator The Hon Simon Birmingham, Minister for Education and Training, and The Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport, have today announced the recipients of Innovation Award grants for research into type 1 diabetes.

Three bold, promising research projects have been selected and will benefit from $4.5 million in funding from the Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN), itself an innovative clinical research program led by JDRF Australia and funded by a Special Research Initiative through the Australian Research Council (ARC).

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In an exciting paradigm shift that aims to accelerate patient impact, the research funded by the Innovation Award grants will explore new directions in the search for a cure for type 1 diabetes, including concepts that have never before been investigated.

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World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.

Tocilizumab

The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More

T1DCRN awards $14 million for type 1 diabetes clinical research

The Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) announced today that over $14 million in grants have been awarded to Australian researchers for clinical research projects commencing in 2016.

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This funding forms part of the $35 million funding awarded to the T1DCRN by the Australian Research Council, and will support five innovative programs targeting a broad range of T1D research areas including: Read More

Innovative biodegradable scaffold protects transplanted islets

A new technique that could drastically improve outcomes of human islet transplantation has been successful in a world-first clinical trial.

BioHub scaffold

The technique, developed by the US-based Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) and supported in part by JDRF funding, involves transplanting islets in a biodegradable ‘scaffold’ into the omentum, a fold of tissue that covers and protects the abdominal organs. Read More

Psoriasis drug may halt the destruction of beta cells in T1D

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be able to preserve their remaining beta cells with alefacept, a drug normally used for psoriasis.

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A recent clinical trial has shown that alefacept was able to slow or halt the progression of beta cell destruction in people newly diagnosed with T1D, even two years after completing treatment. Read More

Phase II clinical trial of common vaccine to reverse type 1 diabetes

A commonly used vaccine has received FDA approval for a Phase II clinical trial to test its ability to reverse long-standing type 1 diabetes. The announcement was made at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) by Associate Professor Denise Faustman from Massachusetts General Hospital.

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The vaccine is known as bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), and has been used for over 90 years as a vaccine for tuberculosis, and more recently as a treatment for bladder cancer. A 2012 pilot study in adults with long standing type 1 diabetes showed that two injections of BCG spaced 4 weeks apart temporarily reduced the number of auto-reactive killer T cells and increased the number of beneficial regulatory T cells. The vaccine was able to transiently increase the amount of c-peptide in the blood, indicating some restoration of islet function and insulin secretion. Read More

New discovered pathway keeps immune system in check

JDRF-supported researchers from the University of Birmingham have identified a novel immune-regulating pathway that is disrupted in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

immunesystem

The study, published in Nature Medicine, shows how in a healthy immune system, a key molecule called PEPITEM tightly controls the level of response to infection and disease. PEPITEM is secreted by B cells of the immune system, and acts to inhibit the movement of inflammatory T cells from the blood into the tissues. In people with type 1 diabetes the level of PEPITEM is reduced, resulting in inappropriate access of damaging T cells to vulnerable tissues. Read More