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Findings may improve prediction of T1D risk for prevention studies

TrialNet is an international collaborative network that aims to prevent, delay and reverse the progression of type 1 diabetes, involving United States, Canada, Finland, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany, Australia and New Zealand.

TrialNet in Australia/New Zealand is led by A/Prof John Wentworth at Walter & Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) in collaboration with Prof Peter Colman AM.

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Tool could help predict lack of ‘honeymoon phase’ in young people with type 1 diabetes

A new study has developed a prediction tool to help clinicians predict which newly diagnosed children and adolescents are unlikely to experience a period of remission.

The remission phase, also called the honeymoon phase, is the period of time after clinical diagnosis of T1D where the body can make just enough insulin (“endogenous” insulin) to control blood glucose levels either without needing insulin injections or with significantly lower doses.  Read More

The need to screen for additional autoimmune diseases

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often develop other autoimmune diseases, but the frequency and predictive factors for development have not been characterised.

lab research

While the mechanisms for T1D are still under investigation, it is thought there are common immune system pathways that may be similar across more than one, or all autoimmune diseases.  Read More

World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.

Tocilizumab

The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More

Seasonal gene activity linked to increased winter diagnosis of T1D

Our immune systems vary with the seasons, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge that could help explain why conditions such as type 1 diabetes are more frequently diagnosed during the winter months.

WinterColdsmall

The study, funded by JDRF, the Wellcome Trust and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre was published today in the journal Nature Communications. The study shows that the activity of almost a quarter of our genes (5,136 out of 22,822 genes tested) differs according to the time of year, with some more active in winter and others more active in summer. This seasonality also affects our immune cells and the composition of our blood and fat tissue.

Scientists have known for some time that various diseases, including autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, display seasonal variation. However, this is the first time that researchers have shown that this may be down to seasonal changes in how our immune systems function. Read More