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First class of future research leaders feel fibre might find a faster cure

A world first program designed to help medical researchers in type one diabetes develop their leadership skills to help take innovations out of the lab and into the real world has graduated its first intake. The graduates, announced in Canberra on June 26th 2018, have already put their skills into practice, securing funding to look at a dietary supplement that could stop type one diabetes. Read More

Funding for new projects allows prevention research to go deeper

Two promising Australian research projects have been awarded almost $3 million in funding from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, to be administered by JDRF Australia.

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Immunotherapy found to be safe in pilot study of people with T1D

A pilot clinical trial in the US has found a new immunotherapy treatment to be safe in people with new onset type 1 diabetes (T1D).

After clinical presentation of T1D, beta cell loss continues progressively in most people until C-peptide levels, a marker of endogenous insulin production, is absent or present in very low levels. Despite intensive research efforts for more than 20 years, no therapy is currently available to prevent beta cell loss in T1D.

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Children with type 1 diabetes at risk of acute kidney injury following DKA

A new study has found that children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are hospitalised for Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) are more likely to develop acute kidney injury (AKI), a sudden episode of renal failure or damage. DKA is a severe complication that occurs with prolonged hyperglycaemia. It may occur at the initial presentation of newly diagnosed T1D or in someone with pre-existing T1D in times of illness or insulin omission.
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TEDDY project highlights benefit of being diagnosed before symptoms of type 1 diabetes appear

There are a number of genes linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D), but not everyone with genetic predisposition develops the condition. This suggests that there are likely environmental triggers that stimulate the development of T1D. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY), a study part supported by JDRF, is a large prospective, longitudinal cohort study investigating the environmental factors that may contribute to T1D development.

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An article published by the TEDDY study group in Paediatric Diabetes this month highlights the benefits of early diagnosis of children at risk of T1D. Children involved in TEDDY are from six large clinical centres across the US and Europe and are being followed from birth until 15 years of age to track diet, illness, body growth and other life experiences.

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Evidence building for possible virus link in T1D development

A new study suggests a link between enteroviruses, and the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This study, part-funded by JDRF, isn’t the first to find this link but the authors say it’s the largest and most definitive study of its kind to date.

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Professor Keikki HyÖty and Dr Hanna Honkanen led this study published in Diabetologia at the University of Tampere in Finland. They found that children at high risk of T1D who then go on to develop the disease, had a higher number of enterovirus infections compared to those without the disease.

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Common virus increases activity of T1D-risk genes in pancreatic islets

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Image credit: University of Pennsylvania

Infection with a common virus known as coxsackievirus B has long been thought to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. Now, researchers have published evidence that this virus could be driving the activity of the very genes that increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes.  Read More

Early probiotic use could help prevent type 1 diabetes in at-risk children

Giving probiotics to babies in the first few weeks of life may lower their risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a recent study has found.

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The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics found that children who were given probiotics within the first 27 days of life had a 60% reduction in the risk of developing islet autoimmunity, compared with children who were first given probiotics after 27 days or not at all. Read More

World first trial to slow type 1 diabetes development in children

The Australian Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network has partnered with the Immune Tolerance Network to launch a new Australian clinical trial to slow the development of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes in children.

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The EXTEND-P trial is expected to begin recruitment in March 2016 to test the ability of an existing drug called tocilizumab to preserve beta cell function. Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra, is currently approved for use in children with juvenile arthritis. Read More